fusion point research Marketing Research Reports

Marketing to Operating Room Services in Healthcare

Understanding Their Role

A hospital operating room (OR) is where the staff conducts surgical procedures. Operating room services are labor intensive, require expensive equipment and can contribute more than 60% of a hospital’s revenue.1 Keeping the OR running efficiently and safely is vital to the success of the entire hospital. Operating rooms are sterile environments. Access is restricted, and staff wear protective clothing to prevent infection.2

 

Personnel in the OR typically includes3:

 

  • Surgeons – the physicians performing the surgery and directing the course of treatment.
  • Perioperative nurses – registered nurses (RNs) specializing in a variety of operating room tasks.
  • Surgical technicians – staff that move patients into and out of the OR, manage surgical instruments and deliver needed supplies.
  • Anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetist – physicians and nurses responsible for medicine called anesthetics, which blocks pain, makes patients unconscious and regulates other body functions like breathing and blood pressure.

 

Specialized equipment in an operating room generally includes4:

 

  • Patient monitoring equipment – tools used to measure blood pressure, respiratory rate, body temperature, blood oxygen level and many other vital signs.
  • Diagnostic equipment – devices aiding in diagnosis and treatment such as medical imaging technology.
  • Life support machines – equipment that takes over certain body functions (like respiration or blood circulation) during surgery.
  • Emergency resuscitative equipment – a kit, sometimes called a “crash cart”, with tools to treat patients declining in surgery, for example patients with heart failure.

“If a physician make a large incision with an operating knife and cure it…he shall receive ten shekels in money. If a physician make a large incision with the operating knife, and kill him… his hands shall be cut off.” – Code of Hammurabi, circa 1754 BC5

1 “Reducing Human Error: How Placing Patient Safety First Pays Off.” Modern Healthcare 44, no. 35 (2014): 35. EBSCOhost(97873324).

2 “Operating Room.” Encyclopedia of Surgery. Accessed 12/7/15, available at: http://www.surgeryencyclopedia.com/La-Pa/Operating...

3 Time, Forrest. “Roles of Operating Room Personnel.” Demand Media. Accessed 12/7/15, available at: http://work.chron.com/roles-operating-room-personn...

4 “Operating Room.” Encyclopedia of Surgery.

5 “The Code of Hammurabi.” The Avalon Project. Yale Law School. Accessed 12/7/15, available at: http://avalon.law.yale.edu/ancient/hamframe.asp

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Marketing to in Healthcare

Operating room (OR) services are critically important for hospitals. They represent much of the hospital’s revenue and drive a hospital’s reputation. These are the specialized areas where staff conduct surgical procedures.
fusion point research Marketing Research Reports
Operating room (OR) services are critically important for hospitals. They represent much of the hospital’s revenue and drive a hospital’s reputation. These are the specialized areas where staff conduct surgical procedures.
  • – the physicians performing the surgery and directing the course of treatment.
  • – registered nurses (RNs) specializing in a variety of operating room tasks.
  • – staff that move patients into and out of the OR, manage surgical instruments and deliver needed supplies.
  • – physicians and nurses responsible for medicine called anesthetics, which blocks pain, makes patients unconscious and regulates other body functions like breathing and blood pressure.
  • – tools used to measure blood pressure, respiratory rate, body temperature, blood oxygen level and many other vital signs.
  • – devices aiding in diagnosis and treatment such as medical imaging technology.
  • – equipment that takes over certain body functions (like respiration or blood circulation) during surgery.
  • – a kit, sometimes called a “crash cart”, with tools to treat patients declining in surgery, for example patients with heart failure.