fusion point research Marketing Research Reports

Marketing to Maintenance Management in Manufacturing

Understanding Their Role

Major manufacturers rely on large, complex machines in the production process. Assets such as robots, molding machines, conveyors, and welders are massive investments – sometimes costing tens or even hundreds of millions of dollars.1 Keeping these machines running efficiently can have an impact on overall corporate performance.2 Manufacturers employ maintenance, repair and operations (MRO) functions to ensure these machines run consistently until the end of their service life. These departments often use an approach called Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) to maximize uptime and provide value to the organization. TPM goes beyond actual repairs and maintenance on machines, to include3:

 

  • Giving machine operators greater ownership of the equipment
  • Incorporating lessons learned into the design of new machines
  • Training of maintenance workers, managers and operators
  • Health, Safety and Environmental (HSE) initiatives
  • Improvements in other departments (e.g. scheduling) to aid in maintenance performance

 

There are several types of maintenance tasks performed by MRO teams:

 

  • Periodic maintenance (also called preventative or scheduled maintenance,) is routine work like cleaning, lubrication, inspections and slated parts replacements planned to keep the machine operating smoothly.4
  • Corrective maintenance is the reactive repair of a machine after a breakdown or other production problems (like defective products). The time it takes to complete corrective maintenance is critical to reduce downtime, but repairs on complex, multi-million dollar machines can require a vast array of specialists, custom parts and problem solving skills. In addition, repair work is dangerous and workers must follow detailed safety procedures.5 6
  • Predictive maintenance uses inspections, measurements, trend data, statistical analysis and other techniques to recognize early warning signs and correct problems before they lead to breakdowns.7

“One way to address operational challenges is investing in a comprehensive asset-management strategy. By executing a well-planned, comprehensive approach, manufacturers can actually transform maintenance from an expense into a strategic, competitive asset.”

- Rockwell Automation8

1 Kohal, Harry H. “Enterprise Asset Management: A Societal Oxymoron.” InTech, 2014. HighBeam(3371215761).

2 JUSKO, JILL. “A C-Level Look at Maintenance.” Industry Week/IW 262, no. 3 (2013): 33. EBSCOhost(86284870).

3 “TPM – Total Productive Maintenance.” LeanProduction.com. Accessed 11/27/15, available at: www.leanproduction.com/tpm.html

4 Bakliwal, V. K. Production and Operations Management . 1st. ed. MARK PUBLISHERS, C-390, Ist Floor, Amrapali Circle, Vaishali Nagar, Jaipur-302021, Ph.: 9413678649, E-mail: markpublishers@ymail.com: MARK PUBLISHERS, 2011.

5 Ibid.

6 Friberg, Leah. “Use the Technology at Hand to Ensure Maintenance Efficiency.” Plant Engineering 68, no. 8 (2014): 49 – 52. EBSCOhost(99122562).

7 Bakliwal, V. K. Production and Operations Management.

8 Barr, Jane. “Treating Maintenance as an Asset, not an Expense.” Rockwell Automation, Inc. Accessed 11/27/15, available at: http://literature.rockwellautomation.com/idc/group...

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Manufactures invest significant sums into production machinery. The companies utilize maintenance organizations to maximize the productivity of these critical assets machines. Good maintenance departments go beyond simply repairing machines, and drive improvements in machine effectiveness and safety.
fusion point research Marketing Research Reports
Manufactures invest significant sums into production machinery. The companies utilize maintenance organizations to maximize the productivity of these critical assets machines. Good maintenance departments go beyond simply repairing machines, and drive improvements in machine effectiveness and safety.
  • Giving machine operators greater ownership of the equipment
  • Incorporating lessons learned into the design of new machines
  • Training of maintenance workers, managers and operators
  • Health, Safety and Environmental (HSE) initiatives
  • Improvements in other departments (e.g. scheduling) to aid in maintenance performance
  • Periodic maintenance (also called preventative or scheduled maintenance,) is routine work like cleaning, lubrication, inspections and slated parts replacements planned to keep the machine operating smoothly.
  • Corrective maintenance is the reactive repair of a machine after a breakdown or other production problems (like defective products). The time it takes to complete corrective maintenance is critical to reduce downtime, but repairs on complex, multi-million dollar machines can require a vast array of specialists, custom parts and problem solving skills. In addition, repair work is dangerous and workers must follow detailed safety procedures.
  • Predictive maintenance uses inspections, measurements, trend data, statistical analysis and other techniques to recognize early warning signs and correct problems before they lead to breakdowns.