fusion point research Marketing Research Reports

Marketing to Human Resources in Manufacturing

Understanding Their Role

As in most large companies, manufacturers have Human Resources (HR) departments to attract, retain and maximize the performance of their employees. Since manufacturing employs about one sixth of the US workforce, and is growing headcount, there is a tremendous focus on this sector’s HR challenges.1 HR functions in manufacturing include2:

 

  • Recruiting – this is particularly challenging in the manufacturing sector, where the skilled workforce is aging and the upcoming millennial generation has a negative perception of the industry.
  • Job Design – defining the roles & responsibilities of each job and team.3
  • Compensation and Benefits – HR managers must determine the best way measure and to boost performance while navigating changing regulations, especially in area of health insurance.
  • Training – as new workers replace retiring workers with decades of experience, HR departments are turning to knowledge management and training to address the “skills gap”.
  • Labor relations – about 10% of the US manufacturing workforce is represented by a union.4

 

“Americans see manufacturing in ‘4D’: dark, dirty, dangerous and dull.... It’s time people know the truth: Not only are there jobs; there are high-tech, high-paying, safe, appealing jobs in industry that provide an entry ticket to lifelong careers….” - Carlos Cardoso, Kennametal Chairman, President and CEO.5

1 Hollon, John. “9 Challenges Facing HR in Manufacturing.” TLNT. September 2014. Accessed 11/30/15, available at: www.eremedia.com/tlnt/whitepaper-9-challenges-faci...

2 “6 HR Functions That Drive Results in Manufacturing.” The Overture Group. Accessed 11/30/15, available at: www.theoverturegroup.com/blog/6-hr-functions-that-...

3 Levenson, Alec. “The Promise of Big Data for HR.” People & Strategy, 2013. HighBeam(360357800).

4 “Industries at a Glance. Manufacturing: NAICS 31-33.” U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Accessed 11/30/15, available at: www.bls.gov/iag/tgs/iag31-33.htm

5 Cardoso, Carlos. “Viewpoints: Manufacturing is the New IT Career.” Manufacturing Engineering. April 2014. Accessed 11/3015, available at: www.sme.org/MEMagazine/Article.aspx?id=80331#sthas...

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Copyright © 2016 Fusion Point Research, Inc.

Human resources (HR) managers face unique challenges in manufacturing, especially in the area of recruiting. As the current workforce ages and considers retirement, HR executives are finding new high school and college graduates are often not attracted to manufacturing careers.
fusion point research Marketing Research Reports
Human resources (HR) managers face unique challenges in manufacturing, especially in the area of recruiting. As the current workforce ages and considers retirement, HR executives are finding new high school and college graduates are often not attracted to manufacturing careers.
  • Recruiting – this is particularly challenging in the manufacturing sector, where the skilled workforce is aging and the upcoming millennial generation has a negative perception of the industry.
  • Job Design – defining the roles & responsibilities of each job and team.
  • Compensation and Benefits – HR managers must determine the best way measure and to boost performance while navigating changing regulations, especially in area of health insurance.
  • Training – as new workers replace retiring workers with decades of experience, HR departments are turning to knowledge management and training to address the “skills gap”.
  • Labor relations – about 10% of the US manufacturing workforce is represented by a union.