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Marketing to Emergency Department Leaders in Healthcare

Understanding Their Role

The hospital emergency department (ED) or emergency room (ER) is tasked with providing care to all patients with medical emergencies. Treatment includes the evaluation, diagnosis, and initial care including possible surgery.1 In 2012, there were 136.7 million visits to hospital emergency rooms. 2 The number of emergency room departments as of 2012 was 5004 and that number continues to shrink.3 4 A smaller number of emergency departments treating a rising number of patient visits is putting a strain on emergency care both financially and in overcrowded waiting rooms. The Affordable Care Act that was expected to lessen the number of patients going to emergency departments has, at least in the short term, also contributed to an increase in patients.5 This ever growing use of hospital emergency rooms is requiring hospitals to reevaluate how ED's provide care.

 

Certain emergency treatment centers within hospitals are designated as “trauma centers” though most patients are unaware of the distinction. Hospital trauma centers have demonstrated they meet official state and local requirements. Most trauma centers also go through a verification process administered by the American College of Surgeons (ACS), and the Verification Review Committee. Trauma centers are set up to deal with severe and traumatic injuries in addition to providing comprehensive emergency care. There are different types of trauma centers based on the level of care they are set up to provide according to the number of patients they can treat and available resources. Trauma centers are designated by Levels from Level I – Level IV or V with I being the highest level of care.

 

  • Level I trauma centers - The highest level total care. Are comprehensive regional resources with surgeons on staff 24-7. Are generally part of a teaching or research facility. Many maintain air transport or “life flight” services.
  • Level II trauma centers – Staffed with surgeons on a 24-hour basis. Provide treatment of patients with traumatic injuries. Patients with specific types of injuries or illnesses may be transported to a Level I center.
  • Level III trauma centers - Provide stabilization of patients including emergency surgery, resuscitation, and intensive care. They have emergency medicine physicians on site 24-7. When required patients are transferred to Level I or II trauma centers.
  • Level IV trauma centers - Provide advanced trauma life support (ATLS) including patient assessment, evaluation, diagnosis, and stabilization.
  • Level V trauma centers - Designated to provide basic emergency department care in addition to following ATLS protocols. Surgery and critical care may be available. When required patients will be transferred to a higher level trauma center.6 7

“The reliance on emergency care remains stronger than ever. It's the only place that's open 24/7, and we never turn anyone away. Rather than trying to put a moat around us to keep people out, it's time to recognize the incredible value of this model of medicine that people need.”

- Michael Gerardi, MD, FAAP, FACEP, president of the ACEP8

1  “Definition of Emergency Medicine.” American College of Emergency Physicians. Accessed 10/4/2015. https://www.acep.org/Clinical---Practice-Managemen...

2 Fastats: Emergency Department Visits.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed 10/4/2015. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/emergency-departme...

3 Lee, D.C., B. G. Carr, and T. E. Smith. “the Impact of Hospital Closures and Hospital and Population Characteristics on Increasing Emergency Department Volume: A Geographic Analysis.” Population Health Management . (2015).

4 2012 National ED Statistics”. 2012 National ED Inventory. Emergency Medicine Network. Accessed 10/7/2015. http://www.emnet-usa.org/nedi/USA.htm

5 “ER Visits Continue to Rise Since Implementation of Affordable Care Act.” American College of Emergency Physicians. Accessed 10/4/2015. http://newsroom.acep.org/2015-05-04-ER-Visits-Cont...

6 Griffin, Donald J. Hospitals: What They Are and How They Work. 4th ed. 40 Tall Pine Drive, Sudbury, MA 01776, 978-443-5000, www.jblearning.com: Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2012.

7 “Trauma Center Levels Explained.” American Trauma Society. Accessed 10/4/2015. http://www.amtrauma.org/?page=traumalevels

8 “ER Visits Continue to Rise Since Implementation of Affordable Care Act.” ACEP. May 2015. Accessed 12/2/15, available at: http://newsroom.acep.org/2015-05-04-ER-Visits-Continue-to-Rise-Since-Implementation-of-Affordable-Care-Act

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Emergency departments provide treatment for all forms of medical emergencies. Emergency departments have become overcrowded, and many hospitals are reevaluating how they handle emergency medicine.
fusion point research Marketing Research Reports
Emergency departments provide treatment for all forms of medical emergencies. Emergency departments have become overcrowded, and many hospitals are reevaluating how they handle emergency medicine.
  • - The highest level total care. Are comprehensive regional resources with surgeons on staff 24-7. Are generally part of a teaching or research facility. Many maintain air transport or “life flight” services.
  • – Staffed with surgeons on a 24-hour basis. Provide treatment of patients with traumatic injuries. Patients with specific types of injuries or illnesses may be transported to a Level I center.
  • - Provide stabilization of patients including emergency surgery, resuscitation, and intensive care. They have emergency medicine physicians on site 24-7. When required patients are transferred to Level I or II trauma centers.
  • - Provide advanced trauma life support (ATLS) including patient assessment, evaluation, diagnosis, and stabilization.
  • - Designated to provide basic emergency department care in addition to following ATLS protocols. Surgery and critical care may be available. When required patients will be transferred to a higher level trauma center.