fusion point research Marketing Research Reports

Marketing to Digital Marketing Leaders in CPG

Understanding Their Role

Consumer access to the Internet has revolutionized CPG marketing. Traditionally, consumer products marketers had little direct communications with customers. They focused on brand building, promotions and advertising, but their retail partners handled all interaction with shoppers.1 New media like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, blogs, and online reviews put CPG marketers in direct contact with consumers, presenting a huge opportunity and severe new challenges.2

 

New aspects of digital marketing include:

 

  • 24/7/365 activity – CPG marketers must stay active around the clock to keep up with consumers. Stories, videos and other content can go viral at any time, and brands must be ready to identify and respond to changes.3
  • Two-way conversations – Brand managers must now develop much deeper “brand stories” to engage in longer conversations with consumers. Traditionally, they only needed a surface understanding of what they wanted the brand to communicate, in order to drive packaging or short commercials. These longer conversations can also stray into other areas like sustainability, CSR or general questions about the values of the company.4
  • Loss of control – Now that consumers can actively participate in the conversations about brands, CPG marketers have lost some control of their carefully crafted brand messages. They must be prepared to measure and handle both positive and negative feedback, correct misperceptions and try to move conversations back to the desired brand story.5

 

CPG companies are adapting to this new digital landscape at different speeds. Some have embraced the changes and are investing heavily in digital marketing, while others are more cautious or unable to move from the legacy behaviors that worked in the past.6

“We’ve all been understandably racing to master the new technologies …. I try to simplify by taking the mystery out of the new world and telling our people to look beyond the obsession of technology and turn our attention to what really matters – the consumer experience.” - Marc Pritchard, Procter & Gamble’s Global Brand Officer7

1  Ross, Tim. Beyond the Aisle: Where Consumer Packaged Goods Brands Meet Technology . SolutionsSet. 2013.

2 Tybout, Alice M. and Calder, Bobby J., ed. Kellogg on Marketing. 2nd ed. John Wiley and Sons, Inc., 2010.

3 Ibid.

4 “Masterclass: Make Your Brand a Teller of Tales.” Marketing (00253650), 2014, 1. EBSCOhost(95279064).

5 Tybout, Alice M. and Calder, Bobby J., ed. Kellogg on Marketing.

6 HUDSPETH, NEIL. “Building a Brand Socially.” Journal of Brand Strategy 1, no. 1 (2012): 25 – 30. EBSCOhost(83407646).

7 Dan, Avi. “Why P&G Is Quickly Shifting To A Digital-First Approach To Building Brands.” Forbes. March 2015. Available at: www.forbes.com/sites/avidan/2015/03/12/why-pg-is-q...

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Consumer products companies are racing to take advantage of the new opportunities presented by digital marketing. However, they are struggling to master the deeper, two-way conversations with consumers in an environment they do not completely control.
fusion point research Marketing Research Reports
Consumer products companies are racing to take advantage of the new opportunities presented by digital marketing. However, they are struggling to master the deeper, two-way conversations with consumers in an environment they do not completely control.
  • 24/7/365 activity – CPG marketers must stay active around the clock to keep up with consumers. Stories, videos and other content can go viral at any time, and brands must be ready to identify and respond to changes.
  • Two-way conversations – Brand managers must now develop much deeper “brand stories” to engage in longer conversations with consumers. Traditionally, they only needed a surface understanding of what they wanted the brand to communicate, in order to drive packaging or short commercials. These longer conversations can also stray into other areas like sustainability, CSR or general questions about the values of the company.
  • Loss of control – Now that consumers can actively participate in the conversations about brands, CPG marketers have lost some control of their carefully crafted brand messages. They must be prepared to measure and handle both positive and negative feedback, correct misperceptions and try to move conversations back to the desired brand story.